Friday, January 19, 2018

Easy (really) cornbread muffins

I told Tiffany in an e-mail exchange this week, "Next time, start with 'I use a mix'."

:D

I was providing her all these cornbread recipes because she wanted to make them like her great aunt had -- with corn kernels and jalapenos.

Okay, here's easy (really) cornbread muffins.

Go buy a dry mix at the store (on the baking aisle).  Check the back of the package before leaving store to make sure you have all you need (eggs, usually).

Mix the mix in a bowl as instructed.  Then, add 1/2 of 1 can of creamed corn -- it must be creamed, do not use regular corn.  Spoon into a muffin pan.

(Really easy, easy, easy?  Line the pan with cupcake holders.  That will make for less problems when you have to clean the pan.)

Chop some jalapenos from a jar -- not fresh unless you know what you're doing.

Drop one or two into each muffin.

Put into oven and cook as instructed on the back of the mix.

It's really easy.

I didn't blog last night.

Because I was pissed.

Dylan Farrow.

Can't stand her.

Don't believe her.

And I feel bad but she comes off like a liar.

She also comes off as selfish (notice she said nothing about the two boys her uncle molested -- he's serving ten years in prison for that currently).

And as a liar.

And she had her day in court.

Back in 1992, we had to live through this whole nonsense.

It was such a big story that it was joke time on the talk shows and it was even a topic at the national convention for the Republican Party.  (I think Dan Quayle brought it up, he wasn't the only one to do so.)

So now we're back to it all these decades later?

She had her day.

Two different investigations.

She was not found to be believable.

One group, the New Haven-Yale group, found that she had not been molested and that what she was stating was the result of coaching (from Mia).

She had her day and now she's back to whine again.

And it's not enough for her to attack Woody Allen, she has to attack the people who worked with him.

Honey, start with your own damn mother.  Who was perfectly willing to work with him even after the break up.  (She thought she could make all those charges against Woody and he'd still play opposite her in Manhattan Murder Mystery.  He fired her and Diane Keaton stepped in.)

She's whining about how everything's a trigger.

Grow the f**k up.

You're 32-years-old, grow the f**k up.

I'm serious.

She's selfish and she's a liar.

She had her day in court -- twice.

She was found to be a liar.

And now she's whining again.

It didn't happen and she won't shut up.

She's as disgusting as her trashy mother.  Here's Moses talking about 'loving' mother Mia:

In his earliest memories, “I was awoken in the middle of the night by Mia. I was in kindergarten. I slept in the girls’ room with [my adopted sisters] Lark and Daisy, on the lower bed of the bunk. Mia pulled me out of it. I was still half asleep as she repeatedly asked in a harsh tone if I had taken her pills. It wasn’t out of concern that I had swallowed any, but rather accusing me that I had stolen them from her. She took me to her bathroom. I was crying as she stood over me, scowling. I told her a dozen or so more times that I hadn’t taken them, but finally I said what she wanted to hear. I was forced to lie. However, simply telling her I took them didn’t suffice, and more questions ensued. I had to elaborate on the lie and tell her I had taken four or five pills because I thought they were Tic Tacs.  She pulled me over to the sink and directed me to put her bar of soap in my mouth and then instructed me to wash out my mouth, telling me that lying is a bad thing to do. Once I dried my mouth she put me back to bed. The next day I searched for the missing pills and found them under the cabinet between the toilet and the bathtub; however, I never mentioned it to her out of fear of getting into more trouble. This was the first time I felt truly fearful of her, and it was the start of her instilling fear in me. It began the very long and impossible task of gaining her approval. I can recall numerous times that she let me know the burden was on me to gain her trust.
“The summer between first and second grades, she was having new wallpaper installed in the bedroom I slept in, across the hall from hers on the second floor of the house in Connecticut. She was getting me ready to go to sleep, and when she came over to my bed she found a tape measure. I didn’t even know what it was. She had a piercing look on her face that stopped me in my tracks. It was really scary. She asked if I had taken it. She used that familiar voice I had become attuned to as she explained she had been looking for it all day. I stood in front of her, frozen.  She asked why it was on my bed. I told her I didn’t know, that perhaps the workman left it there. After a couple more demands for the answer she wanted, she slapped my face, knocking off my glasses. She told me I was lying. She directed me to tell my brothers and sisters that I had taken the tape measure. Through my crying and tears I listened to her as she explained that we would rehearse what should have happened. She told me that she would walk into the room and I would tell her I was sorry for taking the tape measure, that I had taken it to play with and that I would never do it again. We practiced at least a half dozen times. It became late, I was afraid and had cried myself out. Once she was satisfied, she took me to the rocking chair and rocked me. After a short while she brought me downstairs and made hot chocolate for me before putting me to bed. That was the start of her coaching, drilling, scripting, and rehearsing.
“Over the next few years, I continued to become more anxious and fearful. At that point, I had learned to fight, flee, or freeze. I often chose the latter two. For instance, as a young child, I was given a new pair of jeans. I thought they would look cool if I cut off a couple of the belt loops. When my mother found I had done this, she spanked me repeatedly—as was her way—and had me remove all my clothes saying, ‘You’re not deserving of any clothes.’ Then she had me stand naked in the corner of her room.”
Monica Thompson was a nanny in the Farrow household from 1986 to 1993. In a January 1993 affidavit to Woody’s lawyers reported by theLos Angeles Times, she said that around 1990 she saw Farrow slap Moses across the face because he could not find a dog’s leash. “The other children were horrified and told their mother that it could not have been Moses who lost the leash. Farrow told the children that it was not their place to comment on the incident. The children were scared of their mother and did not like to confide in her because they were afraid of what their reactions might be.” (Thompson acknowledged that in 1992 she had told Connecticut police that Farrow was a good mother and did not hit her children but that she had lied because she was pressured to support the charges against Woody and feared losing her job. She resigned in January 1993 after being subpoenaed to testify in the custody battle.)



That's the real Mia and probably how Dylan learned to lie (read on about how she says Mommy wants her to lie and she'll get a doll if she does -- Dylan gets that doll).


This is C.I.'s "Iraq snapshot" for Friday:


Friday, January 19, 2018.  Chaos and violence continue and it's getting harder and harder for Hayder al-Abadi to spin present day Iraq as 'success.'





I'm under 25 & I know who Ashleigh Banfield is.

She was the reporter on NYC streets during 9/11.

She interviewed Taliban prisoners during the Iraq War.

& She's the woman who made sure Brock Turner's mugshot was on CNN.

IDK who TF Katie Way is, but she's no journalist.










Actually, Jailain, I'm not sure you know who Ashleigh Banfield is.

Her most courageous moment was regarding the Iraq War -- and that was calling out the coverage of it.

You do mention the Iraq War but I'm not sure you understand that either.  Taliban?

Did you study with Dick Cheney?  Was Bully Boy Bush your tutor?

The Taliban is in Afghanistan.

As for Katie Way, I detest the article she produced (the bad date = abuse nonsense).  But she is a journalist.  And the fact that you're Tweeting about her underscores that.

And I doubt Katie Way would confuse Afghanistan with Iraq.


Iraq where the greed keeps the foreign fighters on the ground . . .




BP strikes deal with Iraq to exploit giant Kirkuk field. Agreement cements Baghdad control over Iraqi Kurdistan after its failed independence bid.











The greedy swoop in.  Iraq's a country with double-digit unemployment (16% is the official number).  An oil rich country that can't take care of its citizens.  Where does the money go?  Don't ask Hayder al-Abadi -- he's spent three years now insisting he was going to fight corruption.  They can do show trials of Sunnis they wrongly call members of ISIS and carry those trials out in 15 minutes but somehow it's different for the corrupt.  Probably the difference results from the fact that the ones stealing from Iraq are the political class.


A country of widows and orphans.  That's what the Iraq War has created and continues to create.


Hayder's taking to crowing a lot lately.




The number of Iraqis returning to their home has now surpassed the number of IDPs in Iraq. With the support of its local and international partners, the will continue working to ensure the safe and dignified return of all displaced Iraqis to their homes and communities








He forgets that many of the displaced have been forced to return and forced to return to unsafe areas.

He also forgets the issue of the ages of the displaced.


REUTERS reports:

About half the 2.6 million people displaced in Iraq after a three-year war with Islamic State militants are children and persisting violence hampers efforts to ease their suffering, the United Nations said on Friday.

While the Baghdad government last month declared victory over Islamic State after wresting back almost all the territory IS seized in 2014, persistent bombing and shooting attacks make it difficult to rebuild the lives of displaced people, according to UNICEF, the U.N. children's agency.
"We believe that as a result of the conflict, a lack of investment over the years, and the poverty ... that there are 4 million children now in need across Iraq," said Peter Hawkins, UNICEF chief representative in the country.


Not really a success for Hayder, no matter how he spins it.

B-b-b-ut at least he vanquished ISIS, right?

Uh . . . no.

From the US Defense Dept this morning:





Strikes in Iraq

There were no reported strikes conducted in Iraq on Jan. 18, 17 and 14.

On Jan. 16 near Rutbah in Iraq, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of three engagements against ISIS targets, destroying three ISIS underground facilities and a generator.

On Jan. 15 near Rutbah in Iraq, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of one engagement against ISIS targets, destroying two ISIS weapons caches.

On Jan. 13 near Mosul in Iraq, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of one engagement against ISIS targets, destroying an ISIS tunnel.

On Jan. 12 near Tuz in Iraq, coalition military forces conducted a strike consisting of three engagements against an ISIS tactical unit.

Yes, the US continues to bomb Iraq.


It says it's targeting ISIS.

That sort of contradicts Hayder's boasts of triumph.

As does the continued violence.  WORLD BULLETIN reports, "At least three civilians were killed Friday in two separate bombings in Iraq’s Baghdad and Diyala provinces, according to local security sources."  And the death toll has now climbed to four with at least two people left injured.


'Success'?  Does that also include the continued targeting of civilians by Hayder's militias?





and have seen widespread violations against Kurds since the military takeover of the disputed areas by the Iraqi army and Iranian-backed Hashd al-Shaabi militias in mid-October.











The more time passes, the less impressive he comes off.

Which is why he wants the elections to be held in May and not postponed.

On the elections, MIDDLE EAST MONITOR reports:


The Iraqi parliament has failed to set a new date for the upcoming legislative elections, Iraqi media sources reported yesterday.

Media sources quoted Members of the Parliament (MPs) as saying that yesterday’s session was devoted to a secret ballot on holding the elections on either 12 May, the date that was announced by the Prime Minister Haider Al-Abadi, or in early December 2018.

During the session, Kurds and Shiites MPs both stressed the importance of holding elections on time, while Sunnis argued that it should be delayed.

Of the 260 MPs in attendance, 149 suggested a secret vote on the matter, but Shiite MPs objected, arguing it was illegal.

Parliament speaker Salim Al-Jabouri, a Sunni, decided at the end of yesterday’s session to postpone the voting session to next Saturday, after the “secret voting to delay the elections failed.”


If elections are going to take place in May, this vote needs to happen soon.  In the past, three months has been used as the minimum required to prepare for elections.  Electronic voting -- if paper ballots are indeed out the window in Iraq as some insist -- will not mean less time required since there will need to be training and planning to utilize those.

The US Embassy in Baghdad issued the following yesterday:


The U.S. government strongly supports holding the Iraqi national elections in May 2018, in line with the Iraqi constitution.  Postponing the elections would set a dangerous precedent, undermining the constitution and damaging Iraq’s long-term democratic development.
To that end, the United States is providing assistance that will help ensure that all Iraqi voices are heard and counted, including the approximately 2.6 million Iraqis who remain displaced from their homes in the liberated areas.  USAID is assisting in the training of local civil society groups in election monitoring and providing Iraq’s Independent High Electoral Commission (IHEC) with six elections advisors who will help IHEC strengthen its electoral systems, personnel, and processes in the following ways:


  • Enfranchise internally displaced Iraqis by focusing on voter registration and ensuring electronic voting systems are effective.
  • Improve provincial electoral administrative capacity to support voting in recently liberated areas.
  • Help the new IHEC Board of Commissioners finalize a sound operational plan for the May 2018 elections.


Support for Iraq’s democratic institutions is a key part of the United States’ ongoing commitment to a federal, democratic, prosperous, and unified Iraq.  By exercising their constitutional right to vote, Iraqis will signal their commitment to governance through peaceful processes rather than through violence.



The following community sites -- plus Jody Watley, PACIFICA EVENING NEWS and LATINO USA --  updated:





Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Exactly

When it comes to "national security" that is security for the ruling elite to continue their class rule there is bi-partisan support from both capitalist parties.



Exactly.

This is C.I.'s "Iraq snapshot" for Wednesday:


Wednesday, January 17, 2018.  The Iraq War continues, Iraq War veteran Adam Kokesh is arrested, Hayder al-Abadi wants elections in May, and much more.




What is going on?




Adam Kokesh Arrested! "If you don't hear from me, please come find me!"

Please help get Adam out of jail:

Video:





Watch Adam's girlfriend provide an update to today's kidnapping:





1. Announce your candidacy for .
2. Get pulled over & issued a warning within 10 mins.
3. 30 mins later, get pulled the 2nd time.
4. Watch as the K-9 unit arrives & it is not to play w/Baloo.
5. Go to .

Help get Adam out of jail:


0:10
7,117 views






Adam Kokesh is an Iraq War veteran.


Brian Doherty (REASON) reported last night:


A video of the second pullover that led to the arrest can be found on Facebook (and is embedded below). It shows highway patrol officers instructing Kokesh to shut off his camera at the point a police dog, off-camera, was said to have "alerted" to the RV. Kokesh was pulled over for driving 74 in a 65 zone, according to one officer in the video.
According to the Texas ACLU, the police do not have the right to demand a citizen stop videotaping willy-nilly though they have the loophole I'm sure they'd summon here regarding "truly interfering with legitimate law enforcement operations." The ACLU notes that "Professional officers, however, realize that such operations are subject to public scrutiny, including by citizens photographing them."
Jacob Sullum at Reason in a classic 2013 cover story demolished the probity of the "dog alert=suspension of Fourth Amendment rights" line of thought and practice.
A spokeswoman for the Wise County Jail confirms Kokesh is in their custody on four charges, one related to possession of under two ounces of marijuana, two related to possession of another controlled substance she was not able to specify, and one for "tampering and/or fabricating evidence with intent to impair" a police investigation. He will likely be arraigned and have bond set tomorrow.


The arrest follows Adam filing to seek the Libertarian Party's presidential nomination which may remind some of Adam's last arrest.  In April of last year, Adam was organizing a protest against the bombing of Syria when, immediately ahead of the protest, he was arrested.

Adam's presidential campaign issued the following yesterday:



Longtime activist and former Marine, Adam Kokesh, made a celebratory announcement today that he has officially filed all paperwork necessary to run as a candidate for the office of United States President in 2020.


That announcement took place around 12:30pm EST. At 12:40pm EST he was pulled over by Texas State Troopers for swerving and having suspicious tags on No Force One, his tour bus. A brief encounter took place before the tour bus’ ownership was established (Adam has a lease-to-own agreement with the bus’ owner) and Adam was allowed to go free.


Approximately 40 minutes later Adam was pulled over once again, this time for driving speeding along the Texas highway. This encounter was far more aggressive. State Troopers continually escalated the situation until bringing in a K-9 unit which “alerted,” near a storage compartment on the RV. Adam’s dog, Baloo, was also inside the RV.


At that point the State Troopers commanded Adam to turn off his camera and they proceeded to search and seize. He was then arrested and is being held with no charges currently.


We have to fight this injustice. Can you contribute now, to keep this fight alive?


Adam just finished a 4-month long tour across the country in November where he was not pulled over once. Are we to believe that this is just coincidence that he is pulled over twice within the hour after announcing his candidacy?


Along that tour we talked many times about how, “It would get ugly.” Well, here it is, folks.


In his book FREEDOM, Adam observes:


Understanding governments as competing protection rackets makes it possible to understand the reasons for war. Governments give all kinds of noble reasons for starting wars, but they are only as legitimate as any other propaganda. Today, most of them claim they only use military force for defensive purposes, but if all governments only fought defensive wars, militaries wouldn’t be necessary! Governments start wars to expand or strengthen their protection rackets.
Nothing encourages patriotism like war. Governments like war because patriotism leads people to sacrifice for the imagined collective and tolerate more oppression. Patriotism reinforces the essential myth that governments act on behalf of the people, and the language of war often confuses the government itself with the people. When two countries are at war, we often say that one country attacked another, but that is a misrepresentation of one government attacking another government’s territory. Or more precisely, a group of people wearing uniforms of one color from one place, killing people wearing uniforms of a different color from a different place. Countries don’t attack other countries. Governments use violence to expand their power.
Governments also like war because it is extremely profitable for a few special interests. Just the constant threat of war is enough to make the arms industry very profitable. Other than politicians, no one is more eager to buy bombs than a frightened population willing to give up everything to be safe. When a population is frightened enough to support a war, it will support increased taxation and buy war bonds. It will support a massive increase in the money supply, supposedly to pay for soldiers’ salaries and equipment, even though it will only enrich the bankers by devaluing everyone’s savings. Although war spending is clearly a way of diverting productive resources to destructive purposes, governments always count this spending in positive economic measurements to perpetuate the most dangerous myth that war is good for the economy.
War gives governments the excuses necessary to do the things they always want to, but usually can’t in peacetime. During war, governments claim to need new powers, supposedly necessary to protect from a new threat. Those who stand to profit from such wartime policies will attack opponents as unpatriotic. They always say these powers are temporary, but they’re often permanent. War has been used as an excuse to raise taxes, destroy privacy, enslave through conscription, and demand greater loyalty to the collective.
We might think a protection racket would not want to kill too many of its subjects, if only because of the loss of productivity, but governments don’t always behave rationally. They are always seeking more efficient means of exploiting us, but if they have to kill large numbers of people to maintain their oppression of the rest, they will. Sometimes they get carried away and kill so many that some of the oppressors are affected. Sometimes, governments and their beneficiaries truly lose out in the struggles between competing protection rackets, but war is still a very effective tool. Even with the loss of productivity, wars make governments more powerful.


It's an interesting argument especially as the Iraq War continues.

ISIS is defeated, that's the claim, right?

ISIS is defeated but the US isn't going anywhere.

XINHUA reports:

The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) has flown its final strike mission over Iraq in the fight against Islamic State (IS), an RAAF chief marshal said on Tuesday night.
Australian F/A-18 Hornets have conducted operations in Iraq since October 2014, providing support to troops as they fought to reclaim Mosul and other cities from IS.
Marise Payne, Australia's Defence Minister announced in December that Australia's operations in Iraq would be wound back after the Iraqi government declared victory over the extremist group.



Australia's leaving and the US?

From last Thursday's snapshot:


AP reports that the 10th Mountain Division Headquarters of Fort Drum will be deployed later this year to Iraq.  This news coming in the same week that another US service member is killed in Iraq (the 22nd since August of 2014), Spc Javion Shvonte Sullivan.



And, as Mike noted, 91 of those being deployed?  Members of the National Guard.  Weekend warriors?  The Iraq War is the weekend war that never ends.


Joel Kurtinitis (NOQ REPORT) observes:

Out of 1.3 million active US military personnel, about 450,000 are deployed overseas.  That’s right – nearly half a million Americans are deployed at over 600 bases in at least 130 different countries, at a time when we have exactly zero declared wars.
When are they coming home?
The victory over ISIS, while encouraging, doesn’t remotely put the War on Terror to bed.  Aside from the thousands of soldiers still fighting America’s longest war in Afghanistan and mopping up ISIS in Iraq and Syria, we have hundreds of even thousands of American troops in places like Norway and Poland, and a large Air Force presence in Somalia.  
The last time the United States actually fought a Congressionally-declared war was in WWII, and that’s important because in the absence of a congressional declaration, we have slowly built up a perpetual military presence around the world, with no end in sight.
It wasn’t supposed to be this way.


No, it wasn't.

But the US military presence in Iraq has always been about securing the US asset installed as prime minister.



It's never been about freedom or democracy or anything but protecting the fraudulent 'leader' of the Iraqi people.

From whom?

From the Iraqi people whom he doesn't represent.

So unless the Iraqi people suddenly take to a coward who fled their country decades ago, only to return after the US-led invasion of 2003, the US military will be there forever.

Mina Aldroubi (THE NATIONAL) reports:

Iraq’s prime minister Haider Al Abadi has said that the collapse of his own political alliance will not derail the country's upcoming general elections.
The vote, scheduled for May 12, is the first since security forces routed ISIL, but it has been thrown into doubt because of continued sectarian tensions.
Parliament will hold a session on Thursday to approve the election date.
But concern that the polls may be delayed has risen after the country’s main Sunni alliance, urged MPs to postpone it, to allow almost three million people displaced by the fighting to return to their homes.


Hayder's determined to hold onto elections in May even after his coalition splintered yesterday.  Probably because he's trying to run on "I put an end to ISIS."  Even though he didn't and he hasn't.  Even though the Baghdad bombings this week demonstrate the Islamic State continues.

The longer he waits, the more that reality sinks in.

And what if the Islamic State manages to seize another city in June?

He's got to push those elections and get them to take place in May.

As for the Sunnis?

He knows he won't get their votes so he doesn't care that 3 million of them may not be able to vote.  3 million of them -- that's basically ten percent of the population -- will be barred from voting.

And he's okay with that.


RUDAW notes:

Sunnis in the Iraqi parliament want elections postponed in order to first allow areas ravaged by the war with ISIS to recover.

Citing public interest, social and political justice, and equal opportunity for all Iraqis, the Sunni coalition presented to demands to the parliament, according to documents published by Alghadeer online on Wednesday.

Swathes of Iraq, mainly Sunni, have witnessed largescale destruction in the war against the extremist group. Insecurity still remains in many of these areas and more than 2.5 million people are still displaced.

The Sunni coalition, known as the Union of Forces, requested elections be postponed “for a period no less than one year.”

Should elections proceed as tentatively scheduled on May 12, the Sunnis argue they should at least be postponed in the provinces most affected by the war. 




The following community sites -- plus Jody Watley, PACIFICA EVENING NEWS and BLACK AGENDA REPORT -- updated: